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From engineering student to DR host

Camilla Adam was studying engineering at the University of Southern Denmark when her teacher posted a position to the study programme's Facebook group. Now, she is a new NØRD host and will help broadcast DR's initiative to the nation: Teach children about coding and technology.

By Birgitte Dalgaard, , 9/14/2018

- I love to laugh, and I don't take myself too seriously. I suppose I'm a bit childish, laughs Camilla Adam.

She is the new host of the TV programme NØRD on Ultra, and in a video magazine she will explain technology and ultra:bit to children as part of DR's ambitious plan to teach all of Denmark's fourth year school pupils how to code.

DR has entered the battle to teach children about technology. During 2018, 65,000 fourth class pupils will get their own minicomputer, micro:bit. The project is called Ultra:bit, and the aim is for the children to learn to code over the next three years.

And 25-year-old Camilla Adam is well prepared to guide the children through the world of technology. For four years, she has been studying a BSc in Engineering in Learning and Experience Technology at SDU. Now she will temporarily exchange her books for life as a communicator of technology to children.

Study programme led to job as host

- My study programme was really important for my getting the job as host of NØRD. In my interview, they said that it's mega cool that I'm studying Learning and Experience Technology. It was a perfect match that they were looking for hosts with technological understanding, says Camilla Adam, who will co-host the programme with Thor Kongsgaard Guldager.

At the moment, she is sitting at her desk and tinkering with getting one of the small micro:bits, which are to be sent out to the children's classrooms, programmed to become a piano or guitar. The result will be shown in a NØRD broadcast.

- I've learned things as basic as soldering at the University, that is connecting a circuit, and I've gained a broad technical understanding of the interaction between hardware and software, says Camilla Adams.

Camilla Adams' task will now be to make all her theoretical knowledge about programming, developing games, robots and 3D animations comprehensible to children, to inspire children to learn the language of coding so that they will be crazy about understanding the technology behind computer games.

- I really don't think it'll be difficult for me to make the technical knowledge understandable for children. I myself have a very playful and inquisitive approach to things, smiles Camilla Adam.