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Kommende DIAS Events

Fioniavej 34, Odense M

17.04.2024

11:15 - 12:15

Mitchell A. Lazar - The Emperor's New Data

17 apr

Abstract There is a crisis of confidence in science and scientists, which has been accentuated by an assault on truth and facts that has affected nearly every aspect of our civilized society. I will discuss the problem from both general and personal perspectives, and address the need for scientists to always be skeptical, especially about claims that are too good to be true. About Mitchell A. Lazar Mitchell A. Lazar, MD, PhD is the Willard and Rhoda Ware Professor of Diabetes & Metabolic Diseases at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine. He was received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from M.I.T. and his MD and PhD from Stanford University, then trained in internal medicine and endocrinology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Lazar joined the University of Pennsylvania faculty in 1989 and rose through the ranks to Professor, serving as Chief of the Penn Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism from 1996-2020. Since 2005 he has been Founding Director of the Institute for Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism. Dr. Lazar's groundbreaking research has focused on nuclear receptors and the transcriptional regulation of circadian rhythms and metabolism, and he has has made fundamental contributions to the fields of endocrinology, diabetes, and chronobiology. Mitch has been elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation and its Council, and to the Association of American Physicians and its council, which he served as President in 2020-2021. He is also an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Science, and has received numerous awards from international societies and universities, including the Transatlantic Medal from the UK Endocrine Society, the Luft Medal from the Karolinska Institute, and the Harrison Medal from the Endocrine Society of Australia. Dr. Lazar was also the recipient of the 2023 Fred Conrad Koch Lifetime Achievement Medal Award of the Endocrine Society. He was recently selected to receive the 2025 George M. Kober Medal from the Association of American Physicians, an honorific society of America’s leading physician-scientists founded in 1885 to exemplify the pinnacle of pioneering and enduring, impactful contributions to improve health.

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Fioniavej 34, Odense M

24.04.2024

11:15 - 12:15

DIAS Lecture by Jørgen Ellegaard

24 apr

More information to follow soon...

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Fioniavej 34, Odense M

15.05.2024

11:15 - 12:15

David Woolner - Franklin Roosevelt, Niels Bohr, and the Atomic Bomb – some unanswered questions about a dying president in his last 100 days

15 maj

On April 12, 1945, a stunned world learned that Franklin D. Roosevelt, the leader who had brought the United States through the two great crises of the twentieth century, was dead. Responding to this shocking development, the Danish physicist, Niels Bohr, expressed the view that it seemed impossible to believe that “the great man, upon whom more than anyone else, the hopes of humanity were centered” was gone. What Bohr and the rest of the public did not realize, of course, was that by the spring of 1945 Franklin Roosevelt was a dying man. What’s more, his sudden disappearance from the world stage at this critical moment meant that leader who had orchestrated the alliance that would go on to defeat the forces of fascism and set the stage for the successful creation of the United Nations would not be there to witness these historic developments. Nor would he be present when his government faced one of the most daunting decisions made in human history—the decision to drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Roosevelt’s absence at the dawn of the nuclear age has raised several questions about what might have happened had he lived long enough to witness the successful development of the atomic bomb. Would Roosevelt—whose knowledge of and involvement in the making of the atomic bomb was far more extensive than President Truman’s—have followed the same course of action? Or might FDR have pursued an alternative strategy for ending the war, through negotiation or a demonstration of the atomic bomb’s awesome power. Equally significant, might he have ultimately taken Bohr’s advice and shared the atomic secret with the Russians in such a way as to gain their confidence and perhaps avoid the onset of the nuclear arms race that stood at the heart of the Cold War? As discussed in this presentation, a close examination of FDR’s last 100 days in office offers some interesting clues as to what Roosevelt might have done had he lived long enough to bring the most destructive war in history to an end. About David B. Woolner: David B. Woolner is Professor of History and Kovler Foundation Fellow of Roosevelt Studies at Marist College; Senior Fellow and Resident Historian of the Roosevelt Institute; and Senior Fellow of the Center for Civic Engagement at Bard College. He is the author of The Last 100 Days: FDR at War and at Peace (Basic Books, 2017), is editor/co-editor of five books, and served as historical advisor to the Ken Burns films The Roosevelts: An Intimate History and The US and the Holocaust and for numerous special exhibitions at the FDR Presidential Library and Museum. Dr. Woolner is the recipient of the Fulbright Denmark Distinguished Scholar Award in American Studies at the University of Southern Denmark (2023-2024) and was recently named a Fulbright Specialist for the years 2021-2025 by the US Department of State’s Bureau for Educational and Cultural Affairs. From 2000-2010, Dr. Woolner served as the Roosevelt Institute’s Executive Director, overseeing a significant expansion of the organization’s budget, programmatic dimension and staff. He earned his Ph. D. and M.A. in history from McGill University and a B.A. summa cum laude in English Literature and History from the University of Minnesota. The lecture takes place in the DIAS Auditorium at Fioniavej 34. Everybody is welcome and no registration is needed.

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Fioniavej 34, Odense M

22.05.2024

11:15 - 12:15

Twins and Other Extraordinary Kinships: The Science and the Fascination

22 maj

Nancy L. Segal, professor of Phycology and Director of the Twin Studies Center, at California State University, Fullerton Twins and Other Extraordinary Kinships: The Science and the Fascination Twins have a universal fascination for both scientific professionals and members of the general public. Why this is the case has been a matter of some debate, but several explanations will be suggested. Next, an overview of twin types (identical and fraternal) and the fascinating variations displayed by each type are described and illustrated (e.g., twins reared apart, biracial twins, twins with different fathers) with compelling data and case studies. Some curious, twin-like twosomes are also included, given that they are scientifically informative, as well as fascinating (virtual twins, unrelated look-alikes, switched at birth pairs). Twin research continues to grow and to flourish as more twins are being born and researchers representing diverse disciplines, such as politics, religious studies, and economics, are embracing a twin-based approach to better understand their observations. About : Dr. Nancy L. Segal is a Psychology Professor and Director of the Twin Studies Center, at California State University, Fullerton. She specializes in twin research and teaches courses in developmental psychology. She had authored nine books on twins, most recently Deliberately Divided: Inside the Controversial Study of Twins and Triplets Adopted Apart (Segal, 2021); and Gay Fathers, Twin Sons: The Citizenship Case That Captured the World (Segal, 2023).. The lecture takes place on 22nd of May from 11.15-12.15 in the DIAS Seminarroom, Fioniavej 34. Everybody is welcome and no registration is needed.

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Fioniavej 34, Odense M

29.05.2024

11:15 - 12:15

Powerful Political Metaphors: How Are They Created?

29 maj

DIAS Discussion: Powerful Political Metaphors: How Are They Created? Introduction: Jeppe Nevers Lecture: Timo Pankakoski Commentator: Aglae Pizzone The event is open for all and takes place in the DIAS seminar room

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Fioniavej 34, Odense M

12.06.2024

13:00 - 15:00

Women in transition - minisymposium

12 jun

Minisymposium with Kaare Christensen Focus on the menopause with perspectives from medicine, psychology, society, and literature. More information to come.

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Sidst opdateret: 03.04.2024