New Award

SDU grants new award for Sustainable Development Goals

Christine Stabell Benn and her research team are the first recipients of the Inspiration Award, which SDU has established to support the university’s work on the UN’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals.

By Bente Dalgaard, , 10/23/2019

SDU has instituted a new award: The Inspiration Award.

It is awarded each year to a group of staff or students who have made a special effort to work with the UN’s 17 SDGs.

The Inspiration Award is intended to support the University’s work with “Our SDGs”, and reward efforts that can inspire others and spread in ever-widening circles both here at SDU and in the outside world.

Vaccines and Vitamin A

The award was presented for the first time at the Annual University Celebration on October 25, and the first recipient was Professor Christine Stabell Benn and her team of researchers from the Department of Clinical Research.

They received this award for their research in health, which has resulted in a new understanding of the global vaccination and vitamin A programs that are affecting millions of children worldwide.

Christine Stabell Benn has been involved in ground-breaking health research since her studies at the Bandim Health Project research station in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa, and this project form the basis of studies on the effects of vaccines and vitamin A on overall health.

Survival of children

Both vaccines and vitamin A are given daily to millions of children in low-income countries, and Christine Stabell Benn and her team have demonstrated effects that have major consequences for survival rates among children.

The team has shown that millions of children in low-income countries can be saved if immunization programs are improved.

Christine Stabell Benn is nominated by the Faculty of Health Sciences, which points out that she has shown great courage in pursuing some of the many unexpected results from Guinea-Bissau, one of the most disadvantaged countries in the world.

She has also shown that factors that factors of crucial importance to child mortality in Guinea-Bissau are similarly essential to health in high-income countries.