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PhD projects

Ingeniøruddannelserne på SDU. Fotograf Mette Krull

Current PhD Projects

Name: Sebastian Andersen
Supervisor: Professor Sergey I. Bozhevolnyi
Title: Coupling of individual quantum emitters to localized surface plasmons
The project aim is to realize and study resonant coupling of fluorescence from quantum emitters to localized surface plasmon modes supported by metallic nanostructures. The project constitutes the fabrication of plasmonic resonator-quantum emitter systems and experimental study of the interaction between the emitter and plasmonic mode. The plasmonic near-field interaction may modulate the directivity and temporal and spectral emission properties of the quantum emitter with applications within light-matter interfaces for quantum information processing.

Name: Hamidreza Siampour Ashkavandi
Supervisor: Professor Sergey I. Bozhevolnyi
Title: Coupling of individual quantum emitters to plasmonic waveguide modes
The project is concerned with experimental investigations and theoretical studies of coupling phenomena and resonant interactions between quantum emitters and surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes supported by various plasmonic waveguide configurations, with the overall goal being to efficiently couple single quantum emitters to SPP excitations that can also be efficiently coupled with free propagating modes or modes of dielectric waveguides. Both fundamental and applied aspects of this research will be assessed from the perspectives of quantum plasmonics.

Name: Martin Thomaschewski
Supervisor: Professor Sergey I. Bozhevolnyi
Title: Optical modulators based on surface plasmons
The project is concerned with experimental investigations and theoretical studies of modulation of radiation propagating in the form of surface plasmon polariton (SPP) modes supported by various plasmonic waveguide configurations, with the overall goal being todevelop stand-alone efficient compact ultrafast and low-energy SPP-based modulators and switches. These plasmonic components should also be interfaced with low-loss photonic waveguides and eventually integrated into integrated circuitry of nanophotonic chips. Both fundamental and applied aspects of this research will be assessed from the perspectives of quantum plasmonics. The project goals include the development of experimental (fabrication and characterization) and computational tools for plasmon-based nanophotonics and the realization of efficient modulation of radiation using electrical signals conducted by the same metal circuitry that supports the propagation of the corresponding SPP modes.

Name: Rucha A. Deshpande
Supervisor: Professor Sergey I. Bozhevolnyi
Title: Multipurpose plasmonic phase-gradient metasurfaces
The proposed project is concerned with experimental investigations and theoretical studies of plasmonic phase-gradient metasurfaces enabling broadband polarization-resolved manipulation of optical radiation, with the overall goal being to develop ultra-thin high-numerical aperture optical components operating in visible and near-infrared. Both fundamental and applied aspects of this research will be assessed from the perspectives of plasmon-enabled flat optics. The project goals include the development of experimental procedures and design tools for multipurpose plasmonic metasurfaces, realization of various functionalities using plasmonic metasurfaces and contribution to further progress in understanding of fundamental scattering phenomena involved in light manipulation with gradient arrays of plasmonic nanostructures.

Name: Jes Linnet
Supervisor: Professor N. Asger Mortensen
Title: Electron-based spectroscopy of extremely confined plasmons
The project focuses on electron-based spectroscopy and sample fabrication for the experimental investigation of the physical nature of plasmons. Swift electrons and their low-energy excitations can assist in the characterization of extremely confined plasmons by combining the spatial resolution of electron microscopes and either measurement of electron energy-loss or photodetection of the samples radiative decay. With the extremely short wavelength of swift electrons these microscopes enable subnanometer spatial resolution providing an experimental route around the optical diffraction limit into a realm where classical theory fails and where the hybridization of (too many) states in complex structures limits the practicality of quantum mechanics. The project goal is to provide fabrication methods and to measure and reveal extremely confined physical phenomena to support the development of practical theory that can be applied to complex systems.

Paulo André D. Gonçalves
Supervisor: Professor N. Asger Mortensen
Titel: Novel Two-dimensional Plasmonic Materials in Curved and Engineered Geometries
The PhD project focus on the investigation and research on the nanophotonics of graphene and related 2D materials in engineered nanostructures. Two-dimensional materials have recently emerged as novel platforms to manipulate light-matter interactions at the nanoscale. This project constitutes a theoretical effort to describe and model polaritons (e.g. plasmon polaritons, exciton polaritons, plasmon-exciton polaritons, etc) in cutting-edge nanophotonic architectures towards new devices based on flatland nano-optics and nanoplasmonics. Finally, this PhD research also includes the exploration of nanophotonic phenomena in the regime between classical electrodynamics and quantum mechanics

Sergejs Boroviks
Supervisor: Professor N. Asger Mortensen
Titel: Quantum plasmonics and extreme light-matter interactions
The project is dedicated to the investigation of nanophotonic phenomena in metallic structures occurring in the mesoscopic regime, where classical electrodynamics interfaces quantum mechanics. In particular, plasmonic modes which are supported by 2D electron gas on a monocrystalline metal surfaces (also known as acoustic surface plasmons) will be studied. Both, fundamental and applied aspects of this research will be assessed from the perspectives of quantum plasmonics. Thus, project aims to develop experimental procedures (fabrication and characterization) and theory for investigation of 2D plasmonic materials and to explore limits of the classical theory in application to mesoscopic systems.

Completed PhD projects

Name: Alexander S. Roberts
Supervisor: Professor Sergey I. Bozhevolnyi 
Title: High-temperature  plasmonics for thermophotovoltaic applications
This project is a research effort into the tailoring of optical properties of hot surfaces and their use of in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications. Traditional photovoltaics (PV) relies on the illumination of a p-n-junction with the broadband spectrum stemming from the solar surface. However, any given solar cell only has a narrow window of efficient conversion of the irradiated energy, while energies outside of this window are either converted inefficiently or not converted at all. While expensive and complicated multi-junction PV-cells do alleviate these shortcomings to a large extent, another solution is to illuminate the PV cells only with light that is most efficiently being converted to electric energy in a so-called thermophotovoltaic cell. TPV cells are well-suited both for the primary conversion of concentrated solar light or other sources of intense heat, and for cogeneration.
PhD Thesis: Download

Name: Volodimir Zenin
Supervisor:  Professor Sergey I. Bozhevolnyi
Title: Plasmonic waveguiding by metal nanostructures
The project goal is to develop miniature plasmonic waveguides and waveguide components based on strongly confined surface plasmon modes supported by metal nanostructures. The project comprises near-field optical characterization of plasmonic waveguiding by various configurations of metal nanostructures accompanied by theoretical considerations and design of plasmonic waveguide components, aiming at the realization of basic passive and active photonic components at nanoscale.
PhD Thesis: Download

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