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Sustainable Development Goals

Sustainable Development Goals

Dept. of Technology and Innovation

How ITI works with UNs Sustainable Development Goals 

Since the UN Global Goals for Sustainable Development (SDGs) were adopted on 25 September 2015 at the UN summit in New York, sustainable development has received increasing attention from both private and public players, as well as from individuals. The 17 SDG goals will help the world achieve these goals by 2030, for the benefit of both humans and our planet. 
At Department of  Technology and Innovation we take our responsibility in this process seriously, and since 2016 we have targeted several of our activities towards working on the SDGs.  Our research, education and projects cover several of the SDGs, right from #8 Decent work and economic growth, over #9 Industry, innovation and infrastructure, as well as #11 Sustainable cities and communities and #12 Responsible production and consumption, to #13 Climate action, and #15 Life on land. Read more about our initiatives and projects below. 

 

Civil and architectural engineering

SDU Civil and Architectural Engineering is a multidisciplinary research section, covering a number of strategic research focus areas for the contemporary and future development in the Construction, Architecture, and Engineering sector. The sections research bring focus to

SDG #9 (Industry, innovation and infrastructure)
SDG #11 (Sustainable cities and communities)
SDG #13 (Climate action)

ITI SDG CAE

Click ikon New BSc and MSc program in Civil Engineering

New BSc and MSc program in Civil Engineering:
In addition to the research activities, the section also focuses on the SDGs in relation to the various engineering programmes. Therefore, the section offers a new BSc and MSc program in Civil Engineering. The purpose of the new programs is to train civil engineers to combine knowledge and skills on construction with special skills in sustainability and digital construction – regardless of whether the task is construction of a building, a bridge, city planning or contemporary facades. 
Read article on the new program here   Read more about the new program here

 

 

Click icon Research for the future: 3D-printed sustainable concrete house

You can watch this video and read more about how one of the section’s research units; ’CREATE - Computational Research in Emergent Architectural Technology’, contributes to the development of sustainable construction by 3D-printing resource-saving concrete constructions.

 

Click icon Large cities must prepare for water and heating
One of the section’s research areas, ’Urban Resilience’, focuses on how large cities can address both causes and effects of climate change, in a wider sustainable development perspective. This is a very relevant topic and SDU is therefore building a research group within this area.
 

Read the article, ‘Large cities must prepare for water and heating’

Centre for Sustainable Supply Chain Engineering

The centre is an interdisciplinary research unit. The research program of the centre has been developed in close collaboration with industry and contributes to the sustainable development within the focus areas of manufacturing, industrial and supply chain engineering management. 
The sections research bring focus to:

SDG #9 (Industry, innovation and infrastructure)
SDG #12 (Responsible production and consumption)
SDG #13 (Climate action)

ITI SDG Centre for Sustainable Supply Chain Engineering

Click icon All parts of the supply chain must be sustainable

One of the section’s research areas is ‘Green and Sustainable Supply Chain Management’ which focuses on green and sustainable supply chains in relation to both the public sector and private companies. One of the challenging tasks within this area is that many companies fear that it is expensive and confusing to develop a green and sustainable profile. Therefore, one of the section’s research teams is developing a toolbox that can help especially small companies to overcome this challenge. The team is led by Professor Kannan Govindan, one of the world’s leading and most cited researchers within the area of Green Supply Chain Management. Read more about the toolbox and Kannan Govindan in this article in Danish

 

Engineering Operations Management

The section is an interdisciplinary unit. Research and educational programmes in the section are developed in close collaboration with industry and contributes to the sustainable development within the focus areas of manufacturing, industrial and supply chain engineering management. The sections research bring focus to:

SDG #12 (Responsible production and consumption)

ITI SDG EOM

Click icon Sustainability and circularity as guidelines for procurement
One of the section’s research areas, ‘Sustainable Supply Chain Management’, focuses on green and sustainable supply chains in relation to both public and private companies. In this article you can read how the public sector can contribute to the green transition by using sustainability and circularity as the most important indicators for public procurement. However, as evident in the article, this can be a challenging task. On the basis of the concept ‘Sustainable Procurement’, one of the section’s researchers Devika Kannan focused on this specific topic in relation to Danish companies in her PhD thesis.  

Read more about the concept and the challenges it poses for the companies and the public sector in this article in English 

Innovation and Design Engineering

The section has a holistic approach to product development, innovation and entrepreneurship involving relevant aspects within technology, design, market understanding, society and business economics. The sections research bring focus to:

SDG #9 (Industry, innovation and infrastructure)
SDG #12 (Responsible production and consumption)

ITI SDG IDE

Click icon Engineers must think circular in product creation

One of the section’s focus areas in relation to the SDGs has been to rethink the Product Development and Innovation programme. As of February 2020, sustainability will be a fundamental value when the students work with product creation and innovation. This is accomplished by focusing on converting existing products into new products, and by ‘up-cycling’ old materials into new products. This will take place in a circular process where students learn to design entire systems, not just specific products, i.e. the entire process from the selection of material to the retailing of the product to consumers and the subsequent recycling of materials. The students will also learn to ensure proper disposal, when all the properties of the material have reached the end of their service life.

Read article about the reformed programme here

Read more about the new programme here offered from February 2020

Global Sustainable production

This newly established section is part of SDU’s sustainability strategy. The section focuses on sustainable production, which is becoming increasingly important for both private and public companies. A cost-effective production used to be the main focus of attention for the companies, but today they also have to make sure that the production is lean, innovative and sustainable - and demonstrate social accountability. Therefore, this section comprises a number of newly employed researchers focusing on health and safety at work in Denmark and abroad.  

The section has gotten off to a great start. Professor Peter Hasle and Head of Section Professor Jan Vang have each received grants of DKK 5 million for research projects in Bangladesh and Myanmar, respectively. The sections research bring focus to:

SDG #8 (Decent work and economic growth)
SDG #12 (Responsible production and consumption)

ITI SDG GSP

Click icon Overcoming barriers to improving OHS among SMEs in Myanmar

One example of how the section contributes to the SDGs is the project ‘Overcoming barriers to improving OHS among SMEs in Myanmar’, which has been granted nearly DKK 5 million by the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs. After the tragic incident where nearly 1,100 workers died in the Rana Plaza accident in Bangladesh in 2013, researchers, global producers of branded goods, political decision makers and NGO’s have paid increasing attention towards working for a healthy and safe working environment in the global south, focusing especially on ‘occupational health and safety’ (OHS). 

In this project, Head of Section and Professor Jan Vang and a research team investigates how OHS can be influenced in a positive direction in small and medium-sized companies by combining knowledge about OHS and productivity-enhancing measures (also knows as ‘integrated OHS-knowledge’). The main purpose of the project is to analyze how integrated OHS-knowledge can be expanded and applied successfully in an industry cluster in a developing country, and from there, how this knowledge can be used to build up communication- and implementation capacity at various labor market parties. The project started January 2020 and is expected to be finished by the end of 2022. 
Read this article about the projects

Click icon Safety and health and audit practices in Bangladesh

An example of how the section contributes to the SDGs is the project ‘Safety and health and audit practices in Bangladesh’, which has been granted nearly DKK 5 million by Danida Fellowship Centre. Because Western countries buy large amounts of products in developing countries, work-related health and safety in these countries gain increasing attention. An important element in this process is to monitor the implications of the working processes in order to guarantee the workers’ health and safety, which is a very resource-demanding task. However, we still only know little about how this inspection work out in practice, and whether it influences the manufacturing facilities in the developing countries or not. The project that involves both researchers in the section and other researchers from Denmark and Bangladesh, will therefore try to uncover the inspection-practices and their consequences for the workers safety and health. 
Read article about the projects

 

Mechanical Engineering

The section SDU Mechanical Engineering (ME) focuses on issues within mechanical design, structural dynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transmission and also on materials technology. 
The sections research bring focus to:

SDG #11 (Sustainable cities and communities)
SDG #13 (Climate action)
SDG #15 (life on land)

Mechanical Engineering

Click icon Compact mixer with low thermal mass

The section contributes to the SDGs by doing research in fluid mechanics that focuses on experimental and numerical fluid mechanics (CFD) within environmental improvement such as a reduced use of pesticides, and in catalysts for diesel engines. One of the research projects, ‘Compact mixer with low thermal mass’ focuses on developing a compact mixer to be included in exhaust systems. The goal is to fulfill future emission standards by minimizing the component´s thermal mass and by optimizing the fluid dynamics. 
Read more about the project

 
Click icon ECODRONE

An example of how the section contributes to the SDGs is the ’ECODRONE’ research project. The project aims at reducing the use of pesticides in agriculture, forestry and horticulture. The idea is to observe, carry and spread natural organisms such as ladybugs over targeted crop areas to fight the pests. 
Read more about the project

Click icon NeGev next generation energy efficient ventilation system using phase change materials

Mechanical Engineering also focuses on HVAC (heat, ventilation, air-condition, control), which is a expression used internationally in relation to installing and maintaining heating systems, ventilations systems and cooling systems. However, the European HVAC-industry faces a challenge related to optimizing current technologies that live up to current and future restrictions concerning energy consumption and carbon-footprint. Therefore, researchers from the Mærsk McKinney-Møller Institute, SDU Center for Energy Informatics and SDU Mechanical Engineering at Department of Technology and Innovation have started the NeGev-project, which aims at finding a solution to this challenge. The purpose of the project is to develop a new HVAC system by integrating a PCM-based energy module (a so-called ’climate module’). 

Read more about the project