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Dalia Amor Conde

Associate Professor
Department of Biology

Phone: +45 65502704
Email: dalia@biology.sdu.dk
Webpage: https://portal.findresearcher.sdu.dk/da/persons/dalia

Research interests: Biodemography, database development, conservation demography.

Dalia A. Conde did her bachelor studies in Biology at the National University of Mexico (UNAM) and her Ph.D. in Ecology at Duke University in the USA. During her postdoctoral work at the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research (MPIDR) in Germany, she launched the Conservation Demography Unit under the Evolutionary Biodemography Lab led by James Vaupel. Dalia is a recipient of the Women of Discovery Award (WINGS), the American University of Women (AAUW) International Award. 

Currently, Dalia is an Associate Professor at CPop at the Biology Department at the University of Southern Denmark. Dalia developed and nowadays leads the Species Knowledge Index and initiative to map the open data available for every species on the planet across core disciplines for species conservation. The first index assessed the levels of demographic information on all tetrapod species, a result of the interdisciplinary work of CPop with Species360 and fourteen other organizations. Dalia became the Director of Science at Species360 in 2016, an international non-profit organization that develops the Zoological Information Management System (ZIMS). ZIMS is a real-time database with over 330 million animal and 80 million medical records, on 22 thousand species from a global network of 1200 zoos and aquariums. At Species360, Dalia started and leads the Species360 Conservation Science Alliance to support data-driven decision-making processes for species conservation policies, animal welfare, and management. The collaboration between CPop and the Species360 Conservation Science Alliance aims to bridge the gap between the science and policy interface with the main focus to support the UN Sustainability Development Goals, in which demographic knowledge is used to help save species from extinction.