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Bios and Abstracts

Andreas Refsgaard

bio:

Andreas Refsgaard is an artist and creative coder based in Copenhagen. Working in the field between art and interaction design he uses algorithms, coding and machine learning to explore the creative potentials of emerging digital technologies.

His works have been published in New Scientist, Vice, Gizmodo, PSFK and Designboom, awarded by Interaction Awards and Core77 and exhibited in museums and at festivals in Europe, North America, Asia and Australia.

abstract:

In his artistic practice, Andreas applies a humorous and cheerful approach to the digital tools and their potential applications, purposes and values. His works often consists of imaginative and unconventional combinations of inputs and outputs allowing people to e.g. play music using eye-movement, control games by making silly sounds or transforming drawings of musical instruments into real compositions.

His playful, somewhat wacky and often interactive works are characterised by a naive and openminded approach, which questions and exposes both the possible benefits and drawbacks of the applied technologies in a straightforward and unassuming manner.

Elizabeth Jochum 

bio:

Elizabeth Jochum is the Head of the Research Laboratory for Art and Technology at Aalborg University. Her research  combines robotics and art, and introduced critical and creative approaches to robotics and human-robot interaction. She coordinates the Erasmus+ ABRA consortium on  Artificial Biology, Robotics and Art, and was recently named by Women in Robotics as one of the top 50 Women in Robotics (Read more here.)

 

abstract:

My research uses the visual and performing arts as catalysts for re-thinking how we design and implement robots, AI and other assistive technologies across society. From industrial robots to exoskeletons, my work focuses on developing creative, value-sensitive and human-centered approaches to developing and implementing robots to ensure the technologies we build address the real needs of people. My work involves transdisciplinary collaboration in human-robot interaction, health, and engineering. I focus on critical and creative approaches to health and wellbeing, with an emphasis on dance and disability. I advocate principles of STEAM (STEM + Art) to arrive at more integrated research approaches.

 

Bojana Romic

bio:

Bojana Romic (Ph.D.) is Senior Lecturer in Media and Communication at Malmö University, Sweden. She is also Marie Curie “Seal of Excellence” Fellow , working on a project “The Robot as a Technocultural Icon (Roboicons)” at School of Arts and Communication (K3), Malmö University. Her current research interests include interactions between visual art and AI, creativity research, and socio-cultural imaginaries of robotic technologies.

abstract:

Romic's RoboIcons project examines a selection of robotic artworks as means to investigate how robotic art shapes public imaginaries about robots. Artworks tend to explore technological possibilities unconstrained by the instrumental and commercial demands of the industry. Using Science and Technology Studies (STS) theories as a theoretical backdrop,  the project explores discourses surrounding robots engaged in a cultural production. 

At this roundtable discussion, Bojana will comment on the journalistic narratives about AI, and discuss the role of language in shaping public imaginaries of technological innovations.

Matilda Arvidsson

bio:

I am an assistant senior lecturer in law and theory, and assistant professor of international law at the University of Gothenburg. My research interests are interdisciplinary and include AI and law, legal theory, international law, posthumanism and technology, as well as the embodiment of law in its various forms and in inter-species relations.

abstract: 

My work on AI and law is based in posthuman feminist scholarship. It takes an interest in human and non-human relations as understood and framed through law. One part of my scholarship focuses on AI and digitalization in the field of warfare. It foregrounds how AI and other emergent technologies in warfare enables us to see how the laws of war – International Humanitarian Law (IHL) – creates hierarchies of difference on an inter- as well as on an intra-species level. It suggests that IHL and related laws, in order to be worthy of our time, needs to adjust its ontological basis in a less anthropocentric and less state-centric direction. Another part of my scholarship takes a closer look at how machine learning (ML) can be, and is used, in public law and administration, with a focus on migration law and processing in Sweden. Included in this field is automated legal decision-making in national administrative and international law and practice. A third, and most current, part of my scholarship deals with questions of how AI and digitalization affects questions of democratic representation, participation and the organization of society. Within this field I am currently starting a 5 year research project entitled “Democratic participation, AI and Law in the Human+ Condition”  For more, see: https://www.gu.se/en/about/find-staff/matildaarvidsson

 

Last Updated 24.11.2021